Quote from an English Professor

I read this great quote today that made me laugh a lot. If I ever became a teacher for real, I definitely think I would be this kind of teacher…

 

I am returning this otherwise good typing paper to you because someone has printed gibberish all over it and put your name at the top.
– An English Professor

Returnees Halloween

We had a big party for all of our Returnees kids. It was definitely a blast! We played lots of fun games and made each other into mummies.

The World Series

It’s World Series time. Now I’m fairly certain that everyone in America is well-aware of that fact, be they baseball fans of not. I am a baseball fan, but actually, I was completely unaware that the World Series was happening until I came across an internet article the other day. Living in another country does that to you. So, in that article, I not only learned who was facing off, but also when the Series was set for. Today at work I was reading an article about the World Series. I found out that the Yankees and Phillies are tied at one as they move to Philadelphia for game three. Then I came across a sentence so horrific that I had to stop reading and write this blog instead.

“The clubs work out Friday afternoon on the Phillies’ field, and then the World Series will resume Saturday with a Game 3 matchup of left-handers, featuring Cole Hamels on the mound for the defending champs against Andy Pettitte, the winningest pitcher in postseason history.”

Set aside that fact that this is a horrific run-on sentence. That’s a matter for another day. Let’s face the major problem. What the crap is ‘winningest’?? Couldn’t the writer find any better way to describe the pitcher? I can think of three or four off-hand that wouldn’t take up that much type space and wouldn’t make me sound like such a complete moron. I understand that news articles follow different rules than regular writing, but ‘winningest’ seriously? I will not even mention the over and misuse of hyphens, or misused prepositions. This guy actually gets paid to write for mlb.com? Maybe I should apply. To read the entire article for yourself, check it out here.

Sassy Girl

I have this friend named Saki who is in junior high. Now, when I first met Saki about two years ago, she was extremely shy and quiet. I don’t know whether it was because she became a teenager, finally felt confident in her English skills, or maybe some combination of the two, but she has turned into a sassy girl. And I must admit that I love it.

Earlier this week, her parents were giving me and a friend a ride to the station after our Bible study. I was talking to Saki about having crushes and how it is a wonderful, magical thing for a teenage girl. Saki herself is not so boy crazy yet, and maybe never will be, but she does have a friend who already is at the age of twelve. According to Saki, her friend has a crush on a new boy pretty much every week, which I think is perfectly healthy.

Unfortunately for the girls, their school is really small, so pickings are slim. Just recently, this friend was telling Saki about her latest crush and how cute he was. Being a good friend, Saki didn’t put voice to her thoughts, but did think, Are your eyes okay? Needless to say, all conversation stopped for a full minute while I laughed at that comment.

Now, the Saki I first met would never have even thought something like that, much less retold it in a story. I can only hope that I can help to promote this sassiness in the time that I spend with her.

Deep Thoughts From a Trash Can

You have gotta love it when Japan uses English in the weirdest and most unexpected ways and places. Take the following picture for example. I found this while I was out shopping the other day.

DSC01502I am not sure whether I am supposed to take a long and deep look at what I’m doing with my life, or simply feel patronized about whether or not I’m properly sorting my trash. Either way, random English always keeps me on my toes.